“Politically correct” has struck again. Founded in 1954, this literary award has been renamed by the Association of Children’s Libraries. The series of eight volumes of The Little House in the Prairie that inspired the famous soap opera, is indeed criticized across the Atlantic for its anti-Amerindian and anti-Black.

We all remember this little girl running mats in the wind in the meadow with her sisters. Laura Ingalls, screened from 1974 to 1983 in Melissa Gilbert’s La Petite maison dans la prairie series, is also the central figure in a landmark literary work of the 20th century in the United States. The soap opera is based on Laura Ingalls Wilder’s books, eight volumes inspired by her childhood published between 1932 and 1943. Following a meeting in New Orleans, the Association des Libraries pour Enfants decided on Saturday to rename the book. literary prize Laura Ingalls Wilder because she judges his work racist. The award was thus renamed the Literary Heritage Award for Children. ALSC members were surveyed in May for their views on changing the name of the award. A majority was in favor.

“The works of Mrs. Wilder remain the object of studies and literary analyzes that often highlight anti-Amerindian and anti-Black sentiments,” the organization said. The ALSC recognizes that the author’s legacy is complex and that Ms. Wilder’s work is not universally accepted. “The award was created in 1954. It is awarded at varying rates to authors for their participation in children’s literature. The first prize was awarded to Wilder herself.

A work reflecting his time

The Little House in the Meadow (La Petite maison dans la prairie) tells the story of a family of farmers in the western United States in the nineteenth century. At that time, the New World is still very much rooted in racism. “A good Indian is a dead Indian”, can we read in the pages of the book of Laura Ingalls Wilder, born in 1867 and deceased in 1957. The journalist Samira Ahmed reported all these phrases “unacceptable” in 2010 in an article for the Guardian. “Mrs. Wilder’s books are the product of her life, her experiences and perspectives as a white woman of that time, tried to defend the ALSC. They represent a dominant but not universal cultural attitude towards natives and people of color when they lived and when the prize was created. ”

The series The Little House in the Prairie has been a real success in bookstores. Millions of copies have been sold around the world. In 1974, Michael Landon took the concept back to fit the screen. The TV show will become cult with 205 episodes aired on NBC and around the world. Some wanted to emphasize the author’s contribution to American literature and culture. Its impact, however, remains less than that of Margaret Mitchell’s book, “Take It Up the Wind”, published in 1936 and sold to more than 45 million copies, which has marked an entire generation. Every year for thirty-four years, her famous adaptation was screened at the Orpheum in Memphis, Tennessee. But last year, after the Charlottesville attack, in which an anti-racist activist was killed by a white supremacist, the hall decided to suspend this tradition. Victor Fleming’s ten-Oscar film was the subject of complaints, motivated by “the discriminating portrait of the American blacks and the idealized vision of the Southerners”.

https://www.the-locus.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/XVM07f8972e-7918-11e8-b7ec-0c1045c8ca0d.jpghttps://www.the-locus.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/XVM07f8972e-7918-11e8-b7ec-0c1045c8ca0d-150x150.jpglocus_deskBOOKSBooks,Laura Ingalls award,racism'Politically correct' has struck again. Founded in 1954, this literary award has been renamed by the Association of Children's Libraries. The series of eight volumes of The Little House in the Prairie that inspired the famous soap opera, is indeed criticized across the Atlantic for its anti-Amerindian and anti-Black.We...Celebrities, Movies, Music, Events and More